Rip Factor

Or lack of it, when talking about the FPV. It wears Dunlop 245's all round, and if there's one thing that would benefit the GT-P, it's more grip on the rear. By comparison, a WRX uses 235's and puts its 195kW to work via all four wheels, whereas the GT-P is asked to put 335kW through the rear treads alone. That doesn't help when trying to nail fast sprint times; 5.2sec to 100km/h was the best on the day. But then, HSV's big 275 rear Bridgestones didn't help it get off the line any easier either, even with the competition mode launch control engaged. Though its Tremec manual six-speed slotted through the changes sweetly under the huge load, the HSV couldn't match the FPV's pace, with a 5.3sec best.

When up and grunting, the HSV has no problem keeping itself tidy. Select the appropriate gear, caress the throttle, and the IISV is a tame beast through the bends. With Competition mode on, you'll unearth a few more degrees of slip angle before the slide is caught, but the IISV chassis is so predictable and communicative that it's easy to punt along. With its constantly adjusting magnetic dampers and big sway bars, the Holden wields a stricter control over roll, and gets set for a corner earlier than the FPV, which rolls more before taking its set into the bend. Both sit comfortably through most sorts of corners, but the single-rate dampers of the. GT-P are better than the

FAR RIGHT: GTS adopts the new look Holden interior complete with touch screen navigation and HSV's driver interface,. It's a gimmick really but will keep the kids amused for hours. RIGHT: Both are quick road cars, the HSV has plenty of grip up front but FPV has the more supple chassis adjustable versions of the HSV at absorbing the bumps, particuarly at the rear.

Despite the FPV losing 47kg over the front thanks to its new engine, the HSV is still the lighter car up front (Ford still sites the battery right behind the headlight!). Less weight and a wider track make the front end of the GTS fuse better with the road; you can hurl it into bends and expect no more protest than a mutter of dissatisfaction. But though the new GT is better balanced and will hold on up front longer than the old dog, its rear comes unstuck under power more easily now. So much power and torque, so little adhesion. Try and fire the FPV out under the throttle from tighter bends, and only the traction control will save the tyres from frying. Try switching it off, and it won't be long before you'll need to wind on corrective lock. And it's not a question of if', but 'when' with this machine. FPV has tempered the control of its traction device well, and so it's best kept on. Even on a dry road. Makes for one hell of a fun drive though.

The steering in both vehicles is accurate and well weighted, and feedback provides enough info to keep it interesting. The smart auto makes the GT-P easy to drive. It'll be in the right gear for most occasions, and if you want to fuss about pulling the gears manually, you can, yet it does a pretty good job left in its performance-oriented Sport mode. Neither really has a great feel at the brake pedal but both do a decent job of stopping almost two tonnes of rapid metal.

Though its Tremec manual six-speed slotted through the changes sweetly under the huge load, the HSV couldn't match the FPV's pace, with a 5.3sec best

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new Zealand autocar 45

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subscribe online at www.mags4gifts.co.nz/autocar

new Zealand autocar 45

Release: GtoreMags & fantamagÄMagazines for All

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